Collaboration Areas

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– Insights from Collaboration
Areas 2017-19 (PDF, 8 MB)

Creating great places through collaboration

The Greater Sydney Commission recognises that no single agency or layer of government can deliver great places alone. We developed the Collaboration Areas program as a new approach to address complex city-making issues through better co-ordination and collaboration.

Collaboration Areas are identified as the first action in the Greater Sydney Region Plan. Places were identified due to their metropolitan significance and potential to grow into centres of increased productivity and innovation.

Insights gained from the Collaboration Area Program informed four key themes that underpin our process and approach – promoting shared ownership, maintaining an outcomes focus, creating strong foundations and perseverance.

For more information about our process and insights from the program see Partnerships and Place – Insights from Collaboration Areas 2017-2019.

Who is involved in the Collaboration Areas?

The program brings together local councils, NSW and Australian Government agencies as well as key local institutions and organisations to contribute their respective insights about each Collaboration Area and work together to implement change. This collective approach has provided a framework for resolving issues that may prevent a place realising its full potential. Some issues considered include the need to align growth with infrastructure, making the most of existing assets and establishing an ongoing governance structure to oversee implementation.

What are the outcomes of the Collaboration Area process?

In each Collaboration Area, a Place Strategy has been jointly created by the program’s partners over a 12-month period. The Place Strategy identifies impediments and opportunities and sets out a shared 20-year vision and the priorities and actions to guide the delivery of that vision.

The Place Strategies are reported to the Greater Sydney Commission’s Infrastructure Delivery Committee for endorsement and then the Commission’s Board, for approval. The Place Strategies will be included in future updates of the District Plans and will be implemented collaboratively by councils, state agencies, universities and other stakeholders.

Where are the Collaboration Areas?

        

The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has plans for a research and innovation precinct containing a graduate institute, innovation incubator and technology park.

The ANSTO innovation precinct requires a partnership between three tiers of government to realise its full potential as an economic catalyst in the South District. For this reason, it is identified as a Collaboration Area.

Further details on the ANSTO innovation precinct can be found here: https://innovation.ansto.gov.au/.

ANSTO Place Strategy

The ANSTO Collaboration Area Place Strategy was co-designed by the Greater Sydney Commission and the ANSTO Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group between October 2018 and December 2019. The Strategy was approved by the Greater Sydney Commission in December 2019.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

ANSTO PS summary

Vision

To become a globally connected, vibrant and inclusive community with researchers, start-ups and industries creating inspired solutions in partnership for a sustainable world.

The Innovation Precinct will be a campus that will be connected through walking and cycling links. It will be surrounded by the existing natural landscape and have centres of activity with a mix of lifestyle, cultural, commercial, business and mixed used spaces.

Complex city-making issues

  • Lack of public transport access to ANSTO.
  • Site separated by New Illawarra Road.
  • Anticipated growth in the number of staff, students, Australian and international visitors, start-ups, and high-tech tenants over the next 10 to 15 years.
  • Need for short-term accommodation.
  • Need for essential infrastructure including water, sewer, stormwater, gas and telecommunications.
  • Various environmental constraints including bushfire, flooding, and the protection of flora and fauna.

Immediate imperatives

  • Develop a travel report that details of current and future impacts of the ANSTO Innovation Precinct. Provide the travel report to Transport for NSW to inform transport planning to ANSTO.
  • Investigate opportunities for short to medium-term visitor accommodation, including a hotel and serviced apartments.
  • Conduct discussions with NSW Health about commercialisation opportunities and partnerships.
  • Establish a Collaboration Area Governance Group to ensure ongoing implementation of the actions in the Place Strategy.

Early Achievements

  • Place Strategy endorsed by Greater Sydney Commission’s Infrastructure Delivery Committee and approved by Full Commission.
  • ANSTO Place Strategy referenced in Sutherland Shire Council Local Strategic Planning Statement.

Downloads

ANSTO Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF 14MB)
ANSTO Collaboration Area Map (PDF 4MB)

Bankstown is a strategic centre located in the South District and is receiving significant government and institutional investment including Sydney Metro City and Southwest, a relocated Western Sydney University campus within Bankstown CBD and a $1.3 billion commitment for a new Bankstown hospital. Bankstown Airport is a significant employment generator along with Milperra industrial area.

Bankstown CBD and Bankstown Airport Place Strategy

The Bankstown CBD and Bankstown Airport Collaboration Area Place Strategy was co-designed by the Greater Sydney Commission and the Bankstown CBD and Bankstown Airport Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group between December 2018 and December 2019. The Strategy was approved by the Greater Sydney Commission in December 2019.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

Bankstown PS summary

Vision

By 2036, Bankstown CBD and Bankstown Airport Collaboration Area will be a green, healthy and dynamic destination that capitalises on its diverse culture and its proximity to Salt Pan Creek and Georges River.

It will be a centre for jobs and education, offering 25,000 jobs and places for 25,000 students within Bankstown CBD. It will be a dynamic and connected business incubator at the heart of Greater Sydney and will be a test ground that grows and scales the advanced manufacturing, aviation and health and education sectors.

Complex city-making issues

  • Creating a safe and attractive built environment to encourage walking and cycling.
  • Improving public transport connections such as those between Bankstown CBD and Bankstown Airport.
  • Implementing Green Grid connections along Georges River, Salt Pan Creek and between Bankstown to Sydenham.
  • Reconsidering how land in and around Bankstown Airport is used.
  • Preserving land for commercial opportunities and more jobs.
  • Locating the new Bankstown Hospital and growing Bankstown Health Neighbourhood.
  • Addressing stormwater management network capacity and flooding risk.

Immediate imperatives

  • Develop a place-based integrated transport strategy that considers the health, academic, research and training precinct, growth at Bankstown CBD and connectivity to, from and within the Collaboration Area.
  • Implement the Green Grid and improve walking and cycling along Salt Pan Creek Corridor and Bankstown to Sydenham Open Space Corridor.
  • Establish a governance group to facilitate the implementation of the Place Strategy.

Early achievements

  • Place Strategy endorsed by Greater Sydney Commission’s Infrastructure Delivery Committee and approved by Full Commission.
  • Place Strategy endorsed by City of Canterbury Bankstown Council.
  • Collaboration Area Place Strategy referenced in City of Canterbury Bankstown Council Local Strategic Planning Statement.

Downloads

Bankstown Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF 6MB)
Bankstown Collaboration Area Map (PDF 9MB)

Campbelltown-Macarthur Collaboration Area

The Campbelltown Collaboration Area will build upon Campbelltown City Council’s ‘Re-imagining Campbelltown-Macarthur’ project with the goal of creating a 30-minute city, by attracting and supporting the next generation of jobs, homes and lifestyle with improved connectivity.

Further details, on this project can be found at: https://www.campbelltown.nsw.gov.au/Business/ReimaginingCampbelltown

Campbelltown-Macarthur Place Strategy

The Campbelltown-Macarthur Collaboration Area Place Strategy was co-designed by the Greater Sydney Commission and the Campbelltown-Macarthur Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group between April 2019 and February 2020. The Strategy was adopted by the Greater Sydney Commission in March 2020.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

Bankstown PS summary

Vision

In 2036, Campbelltown City Centre is the attractive capital of opportunity, creativity and culture for the Macarthur region. Designed for people, ambition and innovation, Campbelltown City Centre accommodates walkable and well-connected clusters of intense activity, nestled in a green valley and united by the Bow Bowing Creek spine.

This vision builds on that established in Phase 1 of Reimagining Campbelltown, which was unanimously adopted by Campbelltown City Council in 2018.

Complex city-making issues

  • Improving public transport, walking and cycling connections, reducing reliance on car travel and commuter car parking, and managing flows of freight and through traffic impacts.
  • Reducing urban heat, and expanding blue-green infrastructure, tree canopy and vegetation cover - including restoring Bow Bowing Creek.
  • Planning for and building regional-scale social infrastructure that reflects the centre’s metropolitan role.
  • Boosting existing and attracting new businesses to provide a greater diversity of jobs, matching the skills of residents to local employment needs, and further developing health and education networks.
  • Improving how employment and commercial activities interact to foster innovation and improving the attractiveness, quality and level of activity in the centre.
  • Increasing the diversity of housing types, sizes, tenures and affordability.
  • Supporting the transition to a low carbon, low waste and low resource future.
  • Managing complex governance arrangements to maximise the benefits of infrastructure investment.

Immediate Imperatives

  • Develop a Place-Based Integrated Transport Strategy, that applies the Movement and Place Framework in the City Centre
  • Develop a City Centre Healthy Streets Strategy and staged implementation plan
  • Develop a City Centre Blue-Green Grid Strategy and staged implementation plan
  • Develop an Integrated Water Solutions Plan for the City Centre
  • Establish an enduring governance structure and group to achieve the actions in the Place Strategy and report to the GSC annually on progress.

Early Achievements

  • Place Strategy endorsed by Greater Sydney Commission’s Infrastructure Delivery Committee and adopted by Full Commission
  • Collaboration Area Place Strategy acknowledged in Campbelltown City Council Local Strategic Planning Statement and strong alignment with Campbelltown City Centre Master Plan.

Downloads

Campbelltown-Macarthur Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF, 7MB)
Campbelltown-Macarthur Collaboration Area Map (PDF, 3.0MB)

The Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area, located in the Eastern Harbour City, is one of the largest and most comprehensive health and education precincts in Greater Sydney. The area includes the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, TAFE NSW, University of Notre Dame, University of Sydney and University of Technology Sydney, and medical and research institutions.

A unique range of specialisations in the area presents great potential for the area’s continuing maturity as an innovation district. The key priority of this Collaboration Area is to support the area’s vitality and economic growth.

Camperdown-Ultimo Place Strategy

The Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area Place Strategy was collectively designed by the Camperdown-Ultimo Stakeholder Group between August 2017 and August 2018. The Place Strategy was approved by the Greater Sydney Commission in September 2018.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

Camperdown PS summary

Vision

In 2036, Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area is Australia’s innovation and technology capital. Industry, business, health, education and skills institutions work together, and talent, creativity, research and partnerships thrive. Low carbon living, green spaces, places for people and easy connections support resilience, amenity, vitality and growth.

Complex city-making issues

  • Lack of a cohesive identity, narrative or objectives.
  • Unequally distributed public transport, pedestrian and cycling links within and beyond the area, particularly a mass transit system to connect Camperdown activity node.
  • Poor pedestrian amenity on high-traffic volume roads.
  • Heavily congested roads and limited transport modal options.
  • The conversion of industrial and commercial building stocks to residential or mixed-use developments, limiting availability of employment land and affordable spaces for innovation, research, creative industries and artists, and collaborative projects.
  • Lack of affordable housing for the community, students, key and creative workers, and limited short-medium term accommodation for academic and health visitors.
  • The need for investment in public and private infrastructure.
  • The lack of and growing demand for local open space and community facilities and services and limited capacity to provide these services and facilities.

Immediate imperatives

  • A place based integrated strategy for transport initiatives with Transport for NSW.
  • Local transport options subject to identifying projects and funding sources.
  • An integrated economic development strategy and program of events and activities.
  • New funding sources and advocacy for joint projects and shared initiatives.

Early achievements

  • Camperdown-Ultimo Alliance formed to lead and monitor the Place Strategy.
  • Jointly funded project director to be appointed by the Camperdown-Ultimo Alliance to progress and report on Place Strategy actions.
  • Brief for an integrated transport strategy was developed by Transport for NSW and Alliance.
  • Promotion of joint economic initiatives that underscore the value as an innovation district including:
    • Announcement of Sydney Innovation and Technology Precinct
    • Declaration of Central Station as a state significant precinct
    • Public exhibition of a draft strategic vision for Western Gateway rezoning proposal
    • Announcement of $750 million redevelopment of the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

Monitoring and reporting

The Commission has worked with the Stakeholder Group to report on the progress of the implementation of the Place Strategy to the Greater Sydney Commission’s full board one year on from their approval.

This report aimed to identify progress on implementation, highlights and set new imperatives for the following year.

Downloads

Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF, 8MB)
Camperdown-Ultimo Collaboration Area Map (JPG, 2MB)
Camperdown-Ultimo 2019 Annual Report Summary (PDF 660KB)

Greater Penrith is an important centre in the Western Parkland City. The Greater Penrith Collaboration Area covers the Penrith Central Business District, the health and education precinct, and the tourism precinct from Penrith Lakes along the current length of the Great River Walk to the M4 Motorway. The Collaboration Area is in proximity to the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area and the emerging Western Sydney International Airport and Aerotropolis.

Greater Penrith Place Strategy

Between July 2017 and August 2018, the Greater Sydney Commission worked with the stakeholders to co-design the Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Place Strategy. The Place Strategy was approved by the Greater Sydney Commission in September 2018.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

Penrith PS summary

Vision

In 2036, Greater Penrith is a key metropolitan centre in the Western Parkland City and the principal gateway to Greater Sydney for western NSW, offering sustainable, diverse and growing residential, employment and tourism opportunities.

Complex city-making issues

  • Penrith City Centre’s location on the floodplain causes evacuation issues that will challenge future growth unless carefully managed.
  • Greater Penrith covers a large land area with dispersed destinations and relatively poor connections.
  • Shortfalls in infrastructure provision for the area.
  • Projected growth in the area will exacerbate existing congestion created by private car use and will worsen impacts on several major roads.
  • Impacts of climate change and urban heat island effect are adversely and disproportionately affecting Greater Penrith.
  • There are places with poor urban amenity and low tree canopy cover.

Immediate imperatives

  • Establish a Taskforce to monitor the implementation of an adaptive management framework for the Penrith City Centre and continue to explore possible infrastructure upgrades or other evacuation solutions that would more quickly unlock the development potential of the City Centre while maintaining community safety.
  • Establish an enduring Collaboration Area Governance Group that builds on existing governance structures.
  • Investigate integration between Greater Penrith and the North South Rail Line.

Early achievements

  • Cross-Government Flooding Taskforce established.
  • Transport for NSW engaged widely to advance the Place-Based Future Transport Strategy to help accelerate transport investment.

Monitoring and reporting

The Commission has worked with the Stakeholder Group to report on the progress of the implementation of the Place Strategy to the Greater Sydney Commission’s full board one year on from their approval.

This report aimed to identify progress on implementation, highlights and set new imperatives for the following year.

Downloads

Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF, 7MB)
Greater Penrith Collaboration Area Map (JPG, 870KB)
Greater Penrith 2019 Annual Report Summary (PDF, 800KB)

Kogarah is a strategic centre and dual Council Collaboration Area. Shared across the Eastern City and South Districts its success as a centre is important in achieving the 30-minute city. Future Transport 2056 identifies several mass transit routes that will connect Kogarah to other areas in Greater Sydney.

The Collaboration area is anchored by St George and Calvary Public Hospitals, St George and Wesley Private Hospitals, the UNSW St George and Sutherland Clinical School and St George TAFE Campus and is near to the Sydney Airport and Port Botany. Together, these contribute to the creation of knowledge intensive jobs for Greater Sydney.

Kogarah Place Strategy

The Kogarah Collaboration Area Place Strategy was co-designed by the Greater Sydney Commission and the Kogarah Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group between December 2018 and December 2019. The Strategy was approved by the Greater Sydney Commission in December 2019.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

Kogarah PS summary

Vision

By 2036, the Kogarah Collaboration Area will be a vibrant health and knowledge precinct that fosters innovation, provides access to comprehensive education, is home to research institutions and is well-connected to major economic centres by efficient transport links.

The Collaboration Area will emphasise wellness with efficient, healthy and resilient natural and urban environments, as well as places and movement networks that are high amenity and promote the population health and community wellbeing.

Complex city-making issues

  • Timetabling and capacity issues on trains.
  • Deficiency and low quality of public spaces.
  • Impacts of M6 Stage 1.
  • Limited urban tree canopy cover.
  • Increased development and pressure on infrastructure and existing open space.
  • Provision of housing and accommodation to support the health and education precinct.
  • Movement corridors that limit access and complicate travel.
  • Poor legibility between Rockdale and Kogarah.
  • Limited connections between major economic centres and greater Parramatta.
  • Lack of strong identity around wellness and wellbeing.
  • Dual Council and dual District Collaboration Area.

Immediate imperatives

  • Develop a place-based integrated transport strategy that includes a funding and implementation plan.
  • Develop a master plan and public domain plan that emphasises wellbeing, amenity, safety and safe crossings, cultural infrastructure and activity, with costing and funding.
  • Develop a vision, brand and marketing plan that creates an identity for the precinct and promotes the vision.
  • Develop a climate resilience strategy.
  • Establish an enduring precinct governance structure and group to deliver the actions in the Place Strategy.

Early achievements

  • Place Strategy endorsed by Greater Sydney Commission’s Infrastructure Delivery Committee and approved by Full Commission.
  • Place Strategy endorsed by Bayside Council and received and noted by Georges River Council.
  • Collaboration Area Place Strategy referenced in Bayside Council and Georges River Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statements.

Downloads

Kogarah Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF 12MB)
Kogarah Collaboration Area Map (PDF 6MB)

The Liverpool Collaboration Area, one of three in the Western Parkland City, includes Liverpool’s City Centre, the health and education precinct, the Warwick Farm precinct, and nearby residential and industrial lands.

As Liverpool grows, transforming the City Centre and surrounds with new jobs, infrastructure, sustainable places and a mix of dwellings, requires a coordinated effort from diverse stakeholders.

Liverpool PS summary

Liverpool Place Strategy

The Liverpool Collaboration Area Place Strategy was co-designed by the Greater Sydney Commission and the Liverpool Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group between April 2017 and August 2018. The Strategy was approved by the Greater Sydney Commission in September 2018.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

Vision

By 2036, Liverpool is a rejuvenated river city, offering diverse and growing residential and employment opportunities.
Major health, education and retail precincts, and a network of open spaces and parklands alongside the Georges River, create a rich mix of jobs and workplaces, public spaces, shops and entertainment.

Complex city-making issues

  • Managing the sequencing and coordination of infrastructure with new residential development.
  • Delivering higher frequency public transport services to meet the needs of a metropolitan city and connect to the new Western Sydney International Airport.
  • Improving local amenity through better public spaces and connections to the Georges River.

Immediate imperatives

  • Develop an integrated transport strategy that applies movement and place and addresses the transport challenges associated with delivering the vision, shared objectives and growth profile.
  • Update and complete the Georges River, Brickmakers Creek and Liverpool CBD Overland Flood Studies and prepare floodplain risk management plans
  • Prepare a floodplain constraints categorisation study and a flood evacuation study.
  • Establish an enduring Collaboration Area Partnership that facilitates the implementation of stakeholder actions and builds on existing governance structures.

Early achievements

  • Property NSW is undertaking a review of government-owned land within the Liverpool Collaboration Area to develop a strategy across these sites that supports the delivery of priorities from the Liverpool Place Strategy
  • Transport for NSW engaged widely to prepare the Liverpool Place-based future transport strategy and accelerate transport investment
  • Flood studies and floodplain risk management plan completed by Liverpool City Council.

Monitoring and reporting

The Commission has worked with the Stakeholder Group to report on the progress of the implementation of the Place Strategy to the Greater Sydney Commission’s full board one year on from their approval.

This report aimed to identify progress on implementation, highlights and set new imperatives for the following year.

Downloads

Liverpool Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF, 11MB)
Liverpool Collaboration Area Map (JPG, 2MB)
Liverpool 2019 Annual Report Summary (PDF, 600KB)

The Randwick health and education precinct is located in the Eastern Harbour City. It is strategically located between the Sydney Central Business District and Sydney Airport. It contains the University of NSW Kensington Campus, Prince of Wales public and private hospitals, the Royal Hospital for Women, Royal Randwick Racecourse, Sydney Children’s Hospital and numerous research institutions.

Randwick Place Strategy

The Randwick Collaboration Area Place Strategy was collectively designed by the Randwick Collaboration Area Stakeholder Group between July 2017 and August 2018. The Place Strategy was approved by the Greater Sydney Commission in September 2018.

The Place Strategy identifies a vision and shared objectives for the place and sets out priorities and actions to realise this vision. Some actions are identified as immediate imperatives in order to focus the efforts of the local partners. The actions and immediate imperatives are dynamic and are subject to change as the Governance Group for each area is established and work is completed.

Randwick PS summary

Vision

By 2036, Randwick has matured into an innovation district of engaging places, with a highly integrated university and health campus. Town centres, residential, employment, recreation and community areas are interconnected, allowing people to move, interact and share knowledge and ideas.

Complex city-making issues

  • Anticipated growth in students, staff, key workers, beds and start-ups over the next 10–15 years.
  • Transport access to and from the University of NSW (UNSW) Kensington Campus and the Randwick Hospitals’ Campus to other parts of Greater Sydney.
  • Provision of diverse and affordable housing including student and key worker housing, and short to medium-term accommodation to serve the health and education precinct.
  • Optimising potential for cross-hospital/UNSW initiatives through the future expansion and integration of the UNSW Kensington Campus and the Randwick Hospitals’ Campus.

Immediate imperatives

  • Improve public transport capacity and frequency.
  • Enhance walking and cycling access.
  • Improve cycling connections to key destinations.
  • Pilot low-carbon high efficiency precinct.

Early achievements

  • Governance Group established and operational funding identified.
  • Independent project director appointed to progress and report on Place Strategy actions.
  • Technical working groups established to support greater alignment on local transport and communications initiatives.
  • Hospital and university investment.
  • Stronger relationships formed between core group members.
  • South East Sydney Transport Strategy completed by Transport for NSW (under consideration).
  • Sydney Light Rail opened in December.
  • Place Strategy reflected in Randwick City Council’s Local Strategic Planning Statement.

Monitoring and reporting

The Commission has worked with the Stakeholder Group to report on the progress of the implementation of the Place Strategy to the Greater Sydney Commission’s full board one year on from their approval.

This report aimed to identify progress on implementation, highlights and set new imperatives for the following year.

Downloads

Randwick Collaboration Area Place Strategy (PDF, 8MB)
Randwick Collaboration Area Map (JPG 2MB)
Randwick 2019 Annual Report Summary (PDF 840KB)